Back to: Landscape Architecture major Landscape Architecture major

Providing a unique bridge between the design professions and the environmental sciences, landscape architecture offers creative opportunities to engage in core ecological, cultural and social issues.

The Landscape Architecture major explores the practice, theory, history and long-standing ecological sensibilities that underpin this discipline. Landscape architecture encompasses all scales of design, from large-scale public projects such as the Olympic parks in Sydney and Beijing, to suburban development and smaller urban spaces and gardens. With a worldwide shortage of landscape architects, there has never been a better time to pursue this exciting career path.

Careers

This major can lead to further study in the Master of Landscape Architecture at Melbourne.

Landscape architects are in demand at all levels of government, in both metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas and in landscape architectural, planning, engineering and multidisciplinary consultancy firms. Graduates also find employment with groups such as conservation agencies and land development companies, while others run their own landscape architectural practices.

Subjects you could take in this major

  • This subject provides an introduction to how people identify needs and wants and devise ways of satisfying them through built or engineered manipulation of the environment. Students will consider the antecedents, processes, actors and consequences of designing constructed and engineered environments, systems and artefacts. Issues of movement and perception, environmental behaviour and the responsible use of physical environmental systems will be explored. The subject will address:

    • Design processes and methods, including problem-solving and design proposal perspectives, methods of framing and analysis of design tasks, creative thinking, and methods of synthesis and
      representation of design outcomes
    • Case studies of various scales and times to examine designed outcomes with regard to social, cultural, economic, resource, production and actor relationships
    • Design professions: their history in the production of environments, systems and artefacts, and their differing educations, organisation and practices
  • This subject in the Environments degree will help students understand, digest and communicate visual information. Students will be trained using clear and concise methods to become visually literate using creative information skills and techniques which will be taught to create and shape meaning of ever-expanding databases and information. This will be taught using both digital and traditional graphic and communication skills.

    Students will learn how to create and read flow charts, architectural, urban planning, urban design and landscape diagrams, schematics and technical illustrations and make information easier to understand. This will apply across all Environments streams.

    The subject will demonstrate digital and traditional functions and depict sequences of hierarchies, associations, relationships, interconnections and links with many diverse approaches suitable for application in diverse disciplines.

    Course content will develop graphic skills gained through lectures and practice during tutorials to encourage personal expression, visual interpretation of materials and visually understanding the world. Students will select modules to develop specific skills in digital and traditional mediums.

  • This subject was formerly called Architecture Design Studio 1.

    The core of the undergraduate design sequence is the development of both design thinking and dexterity with tools. The focus of this design subject will be generating design ideas, translating them into architectural form/space/materials/programme, refining the architecture through consideration of arrival, circulation, light, views etc and communicating the architectural proposition through 2D and 3D visual media and oral presentations. Linking these investigations will be the theme of earth, which will be explored conceptually, metaphorically, structurally and technologically – e.g. a grounding in considerations of site, topography, context, material investigations, compositional methods, foundational ideas.

  • This subject was formerly called Architecture Design Studio 2.

    The core of the undergraduate design sequence is the development of both design thinking and dexterity with tools. As an extension of 702-239 (ABPL20027) Architecture Design Studio 1: Earth, the focus of this second design subject will be the generation and articulation of design possibilities through a series of studio projects. Linking these investigations will be the theme of water, which may be explored conceptually, metaphorically, structurally, or technologically – e.g. waterproofing, rain screens, hygiene, perspiration, sports centres, hydraulics, humidity, marine or riverine environments, pools.

  • This subject explores designed vegetation in urban landscapes. The content includes an introduction to plant types and morphology, planting design, information sources for plants, landscape design themes and plant use, recognition and identification of representative plants; plant selection methodologies and case studies of designed landscape and plant use.

  • This subject covers key elements of building services and sustainability at a residential and commercial scale. The subject aims to teach the basic terminology and concepts behind providing comfortable and effectively functioning buildings in terms of sun, envelope, services (water, waste, gas, electricity, data, fire protection), heating and cooling, air quality, acoustics and vertical transport. Using the sustainability tools being used in the industry (FirstRate5, NABERS and Green Star) students will be given a framework in which to understand how buildings perform and their impact on the environment. They will also be introduced to modelling software that will enable them to carry out performance analysis of initial designs.

  • This subject introduces fundamental approaches for thinking about and exploration of landscape architecture. This studio explores ideas of presentation, design processes, and key theoretical concepts relating to contemporary landscape architectural design.

  • This subject will survey the history of architecture and urbanism from the beginnings of shelter to the end of the 17th century in the context of social, technical and environmental settings. It will include the architecture and design traditions of early civilisations in the Middle East, Europe, South Asia, East Asia, South America and the Pacific. It will analyse the values reflected in vernacular buildings (housing), religious institutions (churches, temples), and the power of ruling institutions (state, city, palace and empire).

  • This subject was formerly called Site Planning and Design (Landscape Studio 2).

    This design studio is concerned with the art and science of planning and designing landscapes. The emphasis is on systematically analysing biophysical, social and cultural attributes of sites and their contextual settings and based on this information arranging circulation systems, open spaces, areas of vegetation, buildings and other structures within the context of various landscape settings, from urban to natural, and at different scales. Students will learn how to develop design solutions for sites in ways that harmoniously and responsibly respond to the landscape.

  • This subject introduces landscape as a three-dimensional space. Aspects of site grading and earthwork manipulation will be explored, including their experiential and functional implications. The Importance of landform modelling to the design vocabulary of landscape architecture will be introduced, alongside principles of technical and representational techniques.

  • The core of the undergraduate design sequence is the development of both design thinking and dexterity with tools. Students will undertake a series of studio-based exercises in design demanding greater synthesis of diverse requirements and leading to increasingly resolved designs.

    Emphases include:

    • three-dimensional spatial ordering;
    • the development of an architectural language that can be responsive to different conditions;
    • representation and composition
    • an examination of interior and exterior spaces.

    A variety of exploratory and analytic thinking methods, from concept mapping such as charting, will be introduced alongside a range of three-dimensional media, from digital modelling to physical modelling. Linking these investigations will be the theme of air, which may be explored conceptually, metaphorically, structurally, or technologically – e.g. atmosphere, acoustics (auditoria), music, inflatables, air flow and air quality, ventilation and cooling, wind turbines and wind forces.

  • The subject is the capstone subject for the Architecture major in the Bachelor of Environments. It is intended that the subject will integrate previous coursework in the major. The core of the undergraduate design sequence is the development of both design thinking and dexterity with tools. The focus of the investigations of this subject will be architecture in an urban context, which will be explored by students designing a particular building type, e.g. a theatre, a motel, a car park, a television studio, a school, etc. The project will engage with historical, theoretical, structural, and environmental ideas relevant to the specific project through the lectures and various set design exercises.

  • This subject introduces students to contemporary landscape architectural practice through the medium of its projects, relating these to the domain of landscape and landscape architectural theory using the case study method.

  • This subject will examine the importance of formative ideas in architecture design, culture, technology. practice and history from the Enlightenment to early Modernism.

    The subject will include study of the following themes: enlightenment, the rise of archaeology and neo-classicism; the emerging language of Modernity including the picturesque and revivalism; the industrial revolution and its implications for new modes of engineering and functionalism; the rise of the architecture, landscape and planning professions; designing and documenting the modern metropolis; colonialism and imperialism across the world; visualising the history of architecture.

    Architectural precedents will be considered within their social, cultural, environmental and landscape contexts and analysed through concerns such as spatial organisation, technologies and theories of architecture as expressed in key texts and ideas. International influence and exchange will be examined through comparison to Australian and local significant sites and buildings.

  • The focus of this studio will be on the production of a design for an urban open space. It will introduce a range of precedents, principles, and practices for urban landscape design

  • This is a studio-based capstone subject that bridges design and ecological science. Studio projects will address ecological design as fundamental to modern landscape architectural practice. The studio integrates teaching and learning activities through a digital design platform that enhances skills and prepares students for entry into the postgraduate professional degree.

  • This subject will consider the development of modern architecture during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will include: the origins and development of modernism; changing ideas of housing, urbanism and society; functionalism and expression; materiality and spatial organisation; the changing role of the architect; key ideas of seminal thinkers; reactions to and interpretations of modernism; post-modernism and deconstruction. Particular attention will be paid to global migrations of modernist ideas including Asia/Pacific modernities and the postcolonial condition.

  • This subject will introduce the field of urban morphological analysis and a range of techniques for urban mapping. It will include techniques for mapping and analysis of various layers of urban data, for instance: figure/ground, grain size, building and public space typology, infrastructure, functional mix, movement networks, density, streetlife, character, viewsheds and pools of use. The focus will be on an understanding of how various techniques of urban mapping can creatively contribute to different urban design concepts, approaches and outcomes within a global context.

Entry requirements for the Bachelor of Design

Clearly-in Rank 2016
NA Guide only

The Clearly-in Rank is the lowest score at which students were granted entry in 2016. i

The Clearly-in Rank should be used as a guide for entry. It is not set in advance and may vary from year to year. The Clearly-in Rank is determined by the number of places available, the number of applicants listing the course as a preference and the academic achievement of those applicants.

Access Melbourne 2017
78.00 Guaranteed entry

Access Melbourne allows you to be considered below the Clearly-in Rank. Guaranteed entry is available to eligible students from a rural area or disadvantaged financial background. i

Access Melbourne can help you gain a place in a course, even if your ATAR is below the Clearly-in Rank. Eligible students must apply through Access Melbourne and meet prerequisites.

Find out more about Access Melbourne

Minimum ATAR 2017
85.00 Guide only i

You must achieve the minimum ATAR (if indicated) to be considered for entry to this degree. The Clearly-in Rank may be above the Minimum ATAR, depending on the demand for the course and the number of places available.

Prerequisites

A study score of at least 25 in Units 3 and 4 of VCE Mathematical Methods is required for the following majors: Civil Systems, Computing, Construction, Mechanical Systems, Property and Spatial Systems.

A bridging subject will be available for students who have completed VCE Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2 but not VCE Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 or students who have received a study score below 25 in VCE Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4.

Some double majors are only possible if students have completed specific subjects in VCE or equivalent.