Back to: Electrical Systems major Electrical Systems major

You can major in this discipline through the Bachelor of Science at Melbourne. You can also complete a sequence in Electrical Systems through the Bachelor of Commerce.

Electrical engineers play a key role in the design, implementation and management of electrical and electronic devices on all scales, from electronic microcomputers capable of processing billions of instructions per second to large networks of power lines, substations, telephones and computers. Electrical engineers also design electrical systems for high technology applications such as spacecraft, satellites and electrical energy.

Not only is electrical engineering the central discipline involved in communications, specifically in the civil aviation and the deep space network, it also plays a significant role in the medical field. Electrical engineering has been instrumental in medical developments such as the bionic ear and eye used to restore pathways from the environment to the brain, heart pacemakers and life support systems. It is an integral discipline for our increasingly connected and wireless world.

The Electrical Systems major introduces the fundamental mathematics of signals, systems and information, and the physical science of electrical phenomena.

This major can lead to the Master of Engineering (Electrical) and the Master of Engineering (Mechatronics), and professional registration as an engineer.

Careers

If you complete this major and the Master of Engineering at Melbourne, you could pursue a career as an engineer. The electrical systems major is a pathway to the Master of Engineering degree in either electrical engineering or mechatronics engineering.

Electrical engineering graduates can find employment in a variety of capacities, ranging from research and technical engineering work to management and finance in the following areas:

  • Electrical engineering
  • Control systems engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Signal processing engineering
  • Computer engineering.

They are also employed as technical specialists and managers in a broad array of areas, including:

  • The energy industry
  • Telecommunications
  • Computers
  • Electronics
  • Defence
  • Automation
  • Transport
  • Biomedical technology.

Mechatronics engineers can gain employment with companies that develop and use advanced automation equipment, computer integrated manufacturing systems and ‘smart’ products.

Subjects you could take in this major

  • AIMS

    This subject develops a fundamental understanding of concepts used in the analysis and design of digital systems. Such systems lie at the heart of the information and communication technologies (ICT) that underpin modern society. This subject is one of four subjects that define the Electrical Systems Major in the Bachelor of Science and it is a core requirement for the Master of Engineering (Electrical and Mechatronics). It provides a foundation for various subsequent subjects, including ELEN30013 Electronic System Implementation, ELEN90066 Embedded System Design and ELEN90061 Communication Networks.

    INDICATIVE CONTENT

    Topics include:

    • Digital systems - quantifying and encoding information, digital data processing, design process abstractions;
    • Combinational logic – timing contracts, acyclic networks, switching algebra, logic synthesis;
    • Sequential logic – cyclic networks and finite-state machines, metastability, microcode;
    • Interconnection structures - buses, crossbar switches, interconnection networks.


    These topics will be complemented by exposure to the hardware description language Verilog and the use of engineering design automation tools and configurable logic devices (e.g. FPGAs) in the laboratory.

  • AIM

    This subject develops the theoretical and practical tools required to understand, construct, validate and apply models of standard electrical and electronic devices. In particular, students will study the theoretical and practical development of models for devices such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, transformers, motors, batteries, diodes, transistors, and transmission lines. In doing so, students will gain exposure to a variety of fundamental fields in physics, including electromagnetism, semiconductor materials and quantum electronics. This material will be complemented by exposure to experiment design and measurement techniques in the laboratory, the application of models from device manufacturers, and the use of electronic circuit simulation software.

    INDICATIVE CONTENT

    Topics include:

    Vector calculus for device modelling, Maxwell’s equations, physics of conductors and insulators, passive device models (including for resistors, capacitors and inductors), lumped and distributed circuit models for wired interconnections (including treatment of signal integrity and termination strategies), semiconductors and quantum electronics, static and dynamic models for p-n junctions diodes and bipolar junction transistors.

  • AIMS

    This subject develops a fundamental understanding of linear time-invariant network models for the analysis and design of electrical and electronic systems. Such models arise in the study of systems ranging from large-scale power grids to tiny radio frequency signal amplifiers. This subject is one of four subjects that define the Electrical Systems Major in the Bachelor of Science and it is a core requirement for the Master of Engineering (Electrical). It provides a foundation for various subsequent subjects, including ELEN30013 Electronic System Implementation, ELEN90066 Embedded System Design, and ELEN30012 Signal and Systems.

    INDICATIVE CONTENT

    Topics include:

    • Transient and frequency domain analysis of linear time-invariant (LTI) models – linearity, time-invariance, impulse response and convolution, oscillations and damping, the Laplace transform and transfer functions, frequency response and bode plots, lumped versus distributed parameter transfer functions, poles, zeros, and resonance;
    • Electrical network models – one-port elements, impedance functions, two-port elements, dependent sources, matrix representations of two-ports, driving point impedances and network functions, ladder and lattice networks, passive versus active networks, multi-stage modelling and design, and multi-port generalisations;
    • Analysis and design of networks involving ideal and non-ideal operational amplifiers.

    These topics will be complemented by exposure to software tools for electronic circuit simulation and further development of laboratory skills.

  • AIMS

    The aim of this subject is twofold: firstly, to develop an understanding of the fundamental tools and concepts used in the analysis of signals and the analysis and design of linear time-invariant systems path in continuous–time and discrete- time; secondly, to develop an understanding of their application in a broad range of areas, including electrical networks, telecommunications, signal-processing and automatic control.

    The subject formally introduces the fundamental mathematical techniques that underpin the analysis and design of electrical networks, telecommunication systems, signal-processing systems and automatic control systems. Such systems lie at the heart of the electrical engineering technologies that underpin modern society. This subject is one of four that define the Electrical System Major in the Bachelor of Science and it is a core requirement in the Master of Engineering (Electrical). It provides the foundation for various subsequent subjects, including ELEN90057 Communication Systems, ELEN90058 Signal Processing and ELEN90055 Control Systems.

    INDICATIVE CONTENT

    Topics include:


    Signals – continuously and discretely indexed signals, important signal types, frequency-domain analysis (Fourier, Laplace and Z transforms), nonlinear transformations and harmonics, sampling;

    Systems – viewing differential / difference equations as systems that process signals, the notions of input, output and internal signals, block diagrams (series, parallel and feedback connections), properties of input-output models (causality, delay, stability, gain, shift-invariance, linearity), transient and steady state behaviour;

    Linear time-invariant systems – continuous and discrete impulse response; convolution operation, transfer functions and frequency response, time-domain interpretation of stable and unstable poles and zeros, state-space models (construction from high-order ODEs, canonical forms, state transformations and stability), and the discretisation of models for systems of continuously indexed signals.


    This material is complemented by exposure to the use of MATLAB for computation and simulation and examples from diverse areas including electrical engineering, biology, population dynamics and economics.

Entry requirements & Prerequisites

This major is available through more than one course, both of which have their own separate entry requirements.

You can read more on the the Bachelor of Science & Bachelor of Science Extended pages.