Back to:Classics major

Classics is the study of the languages Ancient Greek and Latin, exploring ancient culture through the literature of ancient Greece and Rome in the original languages. Students who major in Classics progress through one or both of these languages from beginners through intermediate to advanced levels.

Ancient Greek and Latin language study at the University of Melbourne is also available in the Diploma in Languages.

Careers

  • Academia and research
  • Archaeology and history
  • Curatorship, heritage and tourism
  • Communications
  • Diplomacy
  • Government and policy
  • Library science and archival work
  • Public service
  • Teaching
  • Translation and publishing

Subjects you could take in this major

  • This subject is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Ancient Greek language. It introduces students to the grammar of Ancient Greek through word formation, sentence formation, translation, and the reading of simple texts. The aim is for students to acquire the basic elements of the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of Ancient Greek, and attain reading skills, sufficient to begin reading literary and non-literary texts. Students who complete this subject may progress to Ancient Greek 2.

  • In this subject students consolidate the basic elements covered in Ancient Greek 1, and are introduced to more complex grammar and syntax, as well as some of the issues involved in interpreting an ancient language. Increasingly difficult texts are read from a variety of sources. By the end of the subject students should have a sufficient grasp of the language to read texts of moderate difficulty with vocabulary assistance. Students who complete this subject may progress to Ancient Greek 3.

  • This subject is designed for students with some previous knowledge of Ancient Greek (VCE level or equivalent). Students translate and discuss the interpretation of a selected work of a Greek prose genre (e.g., philosophy or history). In tutorials, further work is undertaken on grammar and syntax. Students will also undertake work in Ancient Greek literary and textual criticism. On completion of this subject students should have consolidated their skills in working with Ancient Greek texts and have discovered some of the many important contributions which reading original texts can make to understanding the ancient world. Students who complete this subject may progress to Ancient Greek 4.

  • This subject is designed for students with some previous knowledge of Ancient Greek (VCE level or equivalent) and who preferably have completed Ancient Greek 3. Students translate and discuss the interpretation of a selected work of Greek poetry (Homeric epic). In tutorials, further work is undertaken on grammar and syntax, revising and consolidating knowledge acquired in Ancient Greek 3. Students will also undertake work in Ancient Greek literary and textual criticism. On completion of this subject, students should have consolidated their skills in working with Ancient Greek texts and have discovered some of the many important contributions which reading the original texts can make to understanding the ancient world. Students who complete this subject and Ancient Greek 3 may progress to Ancient Greek 5.

  • This subject is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Ancient Greek language. It introduces students to the grammar of Ancient Greek through word formation, sentence formation, translation, and the reading of simple texts. The aim is for students to acquire the basic elements of the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of Ancient Greek, and attain reading skills, sufficient to begin reading literary and non-literary texts. Students who complete this subject may progress to Ancient Greek 2.

  • This subject teaches students to read Latin and covers the material of two semesters. It covers grammatical concepts and paradigms, sentence formation, translation and the reading of simple texts. The aim is for students to acquire the elements of syntax, grammar and vocabulary of Latin, sufficient to begin reading literary and non-literary texts. Some background in Roman cultural and political life will also be covered. Completion of the subject will enable a student to enrol in Intermediate Latin.

  • This subject is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Latin language. This subject is an introduction to the grammar and reading of classical Latin. It covers grammatical concepts and paradigms, sentence formation and translation and reading simple texts. Background information on Roman culture is woven into the subject matter throughout the semester. The aim is for students to acquire the elements of the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of Latin, and attain reading skills sufficient to begin reading literary and dramatic texts. Students who complete this subject may progress to Latin 2.

  • In this subject students consolidate the basic elements covered in Latin 1, and are introduced to more complex grammar and syntax. Increasingly difficult literary and dramatic texts are read. Background information on Roman culture is woven into the subject matter throughout the semester. By the end of the subject, students should have a sufficient grasp of the language to read texts of moderate difficulty with vocabulary assistance. Students who complete this subject may progress to Latin 3.

  • This subject is designed for students with some previous knowledge of Latin (VCE level or equivalent). Students examine Roman rhetorical practice through the study of an oratorical text, such as a speech of Cicero. In addition, work is undertaken on grammar and syntax to revise, consolidate and extend students' knowledge of the language. Students who complete this subject should be familiar with the structures and stylistic techniques of Roman oratory, be able to identify the roles of rhetorical practice in Roman social and political life, and understand its function as an instrument of Roman elite self-definition. Students who complete this subject may progress to Latin 4.

  • This subject is designed for students who have completed Latin 1, Latin 2 (or Intensive Beginners Latin) and Latin 3. Students read an extensive extract (usually a book) from a Latin epic poem, such as Virgil's Aeneid, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Lucan's Bellum Civile, or Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura. In addition, work is undertaken on grammar and syntax to revise, consolidate and extend students’ knowledge of the language. Depending on the text being taught, students will explore the themes and content of epic, such as warfare, empire, heroic culture, ethnic identity and masculinity, the value of poetry for philosophical expression, and consider how the mythic past is used to reflect upon the author’s own time. On completion of the subject students should develop a good knowledge of a key Roman text and an enhanced understanding of Roman literary culture. Students who complete this subject may progress to Latin 5.

  • This subject is designed for students who commenced the Ancient Greek stream with some previous knowledge of Ancient Greek (VCE level or equivalent) and have completed both Ancient Greek 3 & 4. Students translate and discuss the interpretation of a selected work of Greek prose genre (historiography, Herodotus). In tutorials, further work is undertaken on grammar and syntax, revising and consolidating knowledge acquired in Ancient Greek 4. Students will also undertake work in Ancient Greek literary and textual criticism. On completion of this subject students should have consolidated their skills in working with Ancient Greek texts and have discovered some of the many important contributions which reading original texts can make to understanding the ancient world.

  • This subject is designed for students who commenced the Ancient Greek stream with some previous knowledge of Ancient Greek (VCE level or equivalent), have completed Ancient Greek 3 & 4 and preferably have also completed Ancient Greek 5. Students translate and discuss the interpretation of a selected work of a Greek poetic genre (e.g., drama or lyric poetry). In tutorials, further work is undertaken on grammar and syntax, revising and consolidating knowledge acquired in Ancient Greek 5. Students will also undertake work in Ancient Greek literary and textual criticism. On completion of this subject, students should have consolidated their skills in working with Ancient Greek texts and have discovered some of the many important contributions which reading the original texts can make to understanding the ancient world.

  • This subject is designed for students who commenced the Latin stream with some previous knowledge of Latin (VCE level or equivalent) and have completed Latin 4. Students examine Roman prose fiction through study of the Cena Trimalchionis from the Satyricon of Petronius. In addition, work is undertaken on grammar and syntax to revise, consolidate and extend students' knowledge of the language. Students who successfully complete this subject should be familiar with the structures and stylistic techniques of Roman prose fiction, be able to identify the central themes of the narrative, and understand the genre's parody of Roman social structures and mores. Students who complete this subject may progress to Latin 6.

  • This subject is designed for students who commenced the Latin stream with some previous knowledge of Latin (VCE level or equivalent) and have completed Latin 5. Students examine the genre of lyric poetry through study of the Odes of Horace. The subject will address the key elements of lyric style, the nature of the first person lyric persona, the key themes of the lyric text, and the involvement of the text with contemporary political and social ideology. In addition, work is undertaken on grammar and syntax to revise, consolidate and extend students’ knowledge of the language. Students who successfully complete this subject should be able to read Roman lyric, identify its stylistic features, and analyse its central themes and relationship to conventional Roman culture.

Entry requirements & Prerequisites

This major is available through more than one course, both of which have their own separate entry requirements.

You can read more on the the

Bachelor of Arts&Bachelor of Arts Extended