Back to:Arabic major

The Arabic program offers an integrated way of studying Arabic language and aspects of Arab and Islamic culture. Beyond studying the language itself, you will also have the opportunity to acquire a significant amount of knowledge about the nature of living, seeing, acting and interacting in the ‘Arab way’. With the development of your language proficiency, there will be a growing emphasis on reflection on, as well as critical awareness and discussion of issues related to, Arabic literature and the realms of history, sociology and religion in the Arab world.

Arabic language study at the University of Melbourne is also available in the Diploma in Languages.

Careers

  • Communications
  • Community development
  • Diplomacy
  • Government
  • International relations
  • Translation and interpretation

Subjects you could take in this major

  • This subject is for students with very little or no knowledge of Arabic. Students will be introduced to the sounds of the Arabic language and to the letters and symbols of its writing system, start building their vocabulary and gain an understanding of, and the ability to use constructively some basic structures of the language. Vocabulary and grammar will be learnt and activated through working with texts affording students insights into Arab culture, at this stage concentrating on basic sociocultural matters related to some aspects of everyday living and social conventions. In the process, students will be aided by state-of-the-art textbooks, authentic materials, both written and audio-visual, and the interactive online program developed by Asia Institute staff. Along the way, students will learn to study the language actively and interactively, become audiovisual learners and develop learning strategies to enable them to eventually become self-sufficient language learners capable of independently engaging in the perpetual process of learning a language.

  • This subject forms a thorough introduction to spoken and written Arabic language and Arab culture for students with some knowledge of Arabic. Students will gain an understanding of, and the ability to use constructively some important structures of the language. Vocabulary and grammar will be learnt and activated through working with texts affording insights into Arab culture, at this stage concentrating on sociocultural matters related to interpersonal, intergenerational and family relations, some aspects of everyday living and social conventions. Students will also begin developing a good knowledge of the Arab World, its countries, aspects of traditions and some of the personages who have helped shape the ideas that have informed its recent past. They will acquire the ability to express themselves at a basic level about these topics both in speaking and in writing. In the process, students will be aided by state-of-the-art textbooks, authentic language materials, both written and audio-visual, and the interactive online program developed by Asia Institute staff.

  • Students will be introduced to more complex elements and functions of the language which will enable them to read and engage with authentic texts of moderate complexity ranging from advertisements, letters and emails through newspaper articles and informative texts to poems, which will allow them not only to internalise vocabulary and structures but also to gain a better understanding of the historical, intellectual and spiritual currents informing present-day Arab society and culture. The various audio-visual activities, accessed through the course DVD’s, the online program and the Internet, will further develop students’ listening comprehension and help maintain and augment existing knowledge of vocabulary and structures. Knowledge gained through developing reading and listening skills will be conducive to activating vocabulary and structures, and students will be able to see their progress through the varied writing and speaking activities offering plenty of opportunities for communication.

  • Students in this subject start developing in-depth knowledge of the Arab World in general, as well as of individual countries in the region. This will include approaching the Middle East and North Africa from a historic perspective which is crucial to the critical understanding of its civilisation and to appreciating existing customs, lifestyle and prevailing values. Students will also enjoy reading and/or hearing information about, and texts by, extraordinary Arab writers, poets and singers giving expression to ideas, feelings and aspirations born in the Arab World. In this, students will be aided by the increasingly complex linguistic elements learnt in this course which will make it possible to enjoy the travellers' accounts, biographies, poems, reflective essays, informative reports and newspaper and magazine articles offered during this semester. Students will have the opportunity to convey their own views and opinions and to relate their own experiences in personal accounts and essays, and to present the results of their own small-scale research, conducted using library and web-based materials, in the form of oral presentations.

  • This subject offers students the opportunity to learn, internalise and activate more sophisticated aspects of Arabic morphology and syntax and to develop a deeper analytical understanding of the language. This will be achieved through interacting with a variety of written and spoken texts ranging from travellers' accounts through pieces, evaluative and analytical articles to interviews and short lectures. These will allow students to further their understanding of the history of the Middle East, Islam and Muslim society, as well as modern educational and social trends and movements emerging in the region. Conversations and discussions will provide opportunities to express one’s own opinions and feelings on topics of cultural, social and political nature. Written expression will be developed through the preparation of resumes, summaries, complex narratives, descriptive, informative and evaluative pieces.

  • Students will be fine-tuning what they have learnt so far of Arabic structures, will be adding to their already substantial knowledge of Arabic syntax, and will be sharpening their analytical skills. In the process, they will be reading Arabic poetry, medieval tales, literary prose, informative writing, studies, evaluative, persuasive and argumentative articles, and producing their own informative, imaginative, evaluative, persuasive and argumentative writing. They will also gain insight into the ongoing debate on classical Arabic, Modern Standard Arabic and Colloquial Arabic, and the future of the Arabic language. Students will be watching/listening to TV programs on current affairs and on topics of personal and/or professional interest, interviews and short lectures which will also help to further develop their listening comprehension skills. They will take part in discussions and debates expressing opinions and conveying emotions on a range of more complex cultural, social and political topics. While developing students’ proficiency in the language, the various activities will also help them gain a deeper understanding about the history and culture of the Middle East and the Arab World, and of Islam and modern politics.

  • In this subject students will engage with Arabic language and culture at an advanced level, through close study of Arabic stylistic and rhetorical devices as well as of the finer details of Arabic syntax. In the process, they will be reading literary and historic texts, critical articles, book excerpts and evaluative and argumentative essays of substantial length and academic standards, pertaining to Arabic literature, Arab culture, history and political economy. They will also enjoy reading some examples of Arabic popular literature. Reading activities will be supported and supplemented by opportunities to listen to recorded presentations of greater complexity and length by Arab intellectuals and literati, and to conduct small-scale research. Students will enjoy intensive language practice to help develop their discourse (both written and spoken) and will be producing carefully constructed written texts and oral presentations of substantial complexity in an assured and personal style of their own. Apart from Modern Standard Arabic, students will be exposed to Classical Arabic prose as well as modern idiomatic and conversational forms, learning to follow extended discourse on complex and/or abstract topics, including some non-standard language.

  • In this subject students will continue studying Arabic language and culture at an advanced level, through in-depth study of Arabic stylistic and rhetorical devices as well as of the finer details of Arabic syntax. In the process, students will have the opportunity to study in some depth the Classical Arabic literary tradition through reading and discussing some of the finest examples of Classical Arabic poetry and relevant critical and analytical writings by Arab scholars and intellectuals which will enhance their understanding of the Classical Arabic language. Students at this level will also read modern Arabic short stories, and study modern Arab culture in its historical context through the reading and discussion of essays, analytical texts and full-length editorial articles on a range of issues. Reading activities will be supported and supplemented by opportunities to listen to recorded presentations of greater complexity and length by Arab scholars and intellectuals, and to conduct small-scale research for presentations. Students will enjoy intensive language practice to help develop their discourse (both written and spoken) and will be producing carefully constructed written texts and oral presentations of substantial complexity in an assured and personal style of their own.

  • This subject aims to heighten general awareness of the Arabic language and to enhance the acquisition of Arabic, particularly in aural and oral communication skills as well as to enhance students' sociocultural awareness of the Arab World. Students will be introduced to characteristics of communication strategies, and the sociocultural aspects of the Arabic language. On completion of this subject, students should be able to conduct everyday conversations and manage classroom communication in Arabic with greater sociocultural awareness.

  • This is a reading subject for students who have completed Arabic 9 or equivalent. Readings will be selected in consultation with the student in the first week of the semester and should be completed in line with the guidelines provided to the student. At least 80% of the readings should be in Arabic. Focus will be on one area of Arabic studies, either linguistics or a specific area of Arab culture. Students enrolling in this subject should be able to undertake a small-scale research project in Arabic linguistics or in a specific area of Arab culture and present the findings in a scholarly manner.

  • This is a reading subject for students who have completed Arabic 8 or equivalent. Readings will be selected in consultation with the student in the first week of the semester and should be completed in line with the guidelines provided to the student. At least 80% of the readings should be in Arabic. Focus will be on one area of Arabic studies: literature. Students enrolling in this subject should be able to undertake a small-scale research project in Arabic literature and present the findings in a scholarly manner.

  • This subject aims to cultivate understanding of Arabic language in use, and to equip students with sound communication skills. We will consider key features of Arabic discourse and regional and social peculiarities. Students will engage in activities to enhance their sociocultural and pragmatic competence in Arabic to allow fuller participation in a range of Arab communication settings. Students will also learn to analyse written, online and face-to-face communication in a variety of social contexts, using a number of discourse analysis approaches.

Entry requirements & Prerequisites

This major is available through more than one course, both of which have their own separate entry requirements.

You can read more on the the

Bachelor of Arts&Bachelor of Arts Extended